Poster Session Guidance

!! Please read carefully as we are following a new poster design this year !! 

As we are all adapting to the new normal of online conferences, we’re excited to announce the use of a new poster format specifically designed for online sharing and learning. 

The concept is quite amazing and simple: 

We compose a handful of concise, engaging slides, turn them into a GIF which will run through automatically. The reader will take in your main message in first and then as much information and detail as they wish to stick around for. 

Here is the creator’s short video on the concept on youtube. 

Why the ‘twitter poster’? 

The idea was originally developed for use on twitter, where the format allows taking in new information while scrolling through your feed, without having to click around, zoom into posters, or risk twitter crop your poster in an unintended way. 

Prizes 

There will be prizes for best and runner-up poster in this new format! 

Where will this take place? 

We are holding out ‘poster session’ on a dedicated channel on our slack. This will accommodate research yet to be published or otherwise not shareable publicly, as well as participants without a twitter account. 

If you can, we encourage you to post your ‘poster’ on twitter after the session, using the hashtags specific to your field & #twitterposter, and links to your research (papers, pages, posters) if you want. Please also tweet @JointDTPConf and we’ll retweet your poster! 

How we’ll conduct the ‘poster session’ 

The ‘posters’ will be uploaded in the slack channel, where all participants are free to scroll down and watch the submissions. You can post a short description or links to further research with your ‘poster’.  

Participants engaging with your poster can reply to you in the thread, or by typing @(your name on slack) and you will be able to answer any questions about your research. 

How to create the ‘poster’ 

Since our research streams are diverse, please follow this approach to make your poster accessible and interesting to the audience 

Need to know: Nice to know

Typically, this means...

Main takeaway message; Key results (preferably as figure/s); Why it matters; Methods; Other details

How to save your slide show as an animated GIF 

We suggest you use the ‘twitter poster’ template provided as its dimensions and settings work well on twitter and slack. If you create your own slide deck slides may be cut off by twitter’s cropping algorithm. You can download the template from this link

MICROSOFT POWERPOINT 

Open the ‘twitter poster’ template slide deck and add your content. 

To save click: 

Windows user 

File > Export > Create animated GIF (see images below) 

Mac OS user 

File > Export > File format > Animated GIF 

Set quality to medium, seconds spend on each slide to 4-5 seconds 

Please note*: 

Export as animated GIF’ feature is available to Office 365 Subscribers with Windows Powerpoint Version 2001 (Build 16.0.12410) and Mac Powerpoint Version Version16.34  

We should all have this via our university subscription. If your version is older, follow the steps below to update. 

*How to update your MS Powerpoint to the latest version 

Open Powerpoint > Help > Check for Updates > If necessary, update your Microsoft AutoUpdate first > update your Powerpoint 

APPLE KEYNOTE 

If you use keynote on a Mac, open the ‘twitter poster’ template and add your content. (It may be in .pptx but you can still open it here) 

To save click 

File > Export to > Animated GIF 

Select slides you want to export, and set to values as below (medium resolution performs well, but do check font size); these settings spend around 5 seconds on each slide 

A screenshot of a cell phone

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In case you experience problems with the GIF export that updating the software cannot fix, you are may submit the slide show as an .mp4 file. The process is similar, but you select “mp4” as file format, set quality to “Internet Quality”. We would really like to give this new format a shot though, so please try to use it. 

A screenshot of a cell phone

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LIBRE OFFICE / LaTeX / OTHER

If you use libre office or other software for your presentation, you are recommended to try either:

  1. Screen Record Record your screen whilst clicking through your slides at the desired pace using suitable software (eg. peek for linux). Save your file as a GIF or mp4
  2. PDF -> GIF Alternatively, if you have ImageMagick installed, you can export your slides to PDF, and then convert them to an animated GIF. To convert the slides “example.pdf” to the GIF “example.gif”, use the ImageMagick command:
convert -density 96 -delay 350 -loop 0 -quality 100 example.pdf example.gif

This tells ImageMagick to convert to use pixel density 96, delay by 350% of a second (ie. 3.5 seconds) between slides, loop back to first slide, use high quality, convert example.pdf to example.gif

To change the delay between slides, increase or decrease the argument after “-delay”.

In case you experience problems with the GIF export that updating the software cannot fix, you are may submit the slide show as an .mp4 file. The process is similar, but you select “mp4” as file format, set quality to “Internet Quality”. We would really like to give this new format a shot though, so please try to use it. 

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